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Old 11-11-2017, 03:18 PM   #1
Irish   Irish is offline
 
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"Old Days"

I was sitting in my carport , looking my ride over & I was reminiscing about the "Old Days" when you could simpily build a Bike. You didn't need all of the xtra crap & the bike ran fine (same with cars)(no computers, etc)
You knew if you could go to X's house & get the parts that you needed. I was wondering if I'm the only one that has these thoughts? Irish



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Old 11-11-2017, 07:03 PM   #2
sc00ter   sc00ter is offline
 
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Yes and no. I sold my 64 Impala wagon with factory a.c. and kept my Toyota Camry. I traded my 74 F-100 towards a 01 Ford Ranger. There comes a tipping point were I would rather deal with the technology failing over a simpler vehicle from simpler times. You can still order a base model new car if you dont want the extra options. Being older I have to have a.c., power steering, power brakes, cruise control (adaptive preferred), back up camera, EFI and automatic trans. I know what your thinking, older cars had these options, but newer tech just drives better as far as Im concerned. I drove a late 60's VW Beetle not long ago. What a horrible vehicle! Like a old motorcycle with a roof. I have also passed on a nice Honda Helix in yellow because I like my 200 Burgman more. I'll stick with the modern tech stuff and ride my 98 Zuma when the old school urge hits.
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Old 11-12-2017, 01:41 PM   #3
philr   philr is online now
 
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I have memories of the "Good-ole-days"... Amal carbs with the slide stuck open, buying drive chain at local machine-shop, Lucas electrics, running tires until they were no longer tires. If you needed parts, only chance for "in-stock" was a motorcycle junkyard, for electronics you better know an automotive interchange or easy to modify.

Still have an old pair of engineer boots with a 530 "Master Link" attached. Removing links to continue using a worn-out chain, Flopping sprockets when they were worn, running them until they were no longer sprockets. Of course, this was a time when "gas station attendant" was a viable career choice... and no one cared if you "wanted fries with that."

Admittedly, I still modify parts for custom applications, mostly to stay in practice and because I like the challenge. Since attaining the age of Social-Security, convenience/dependability is most important... late model Tacoma pick-up and more often ride FXBB Softail Street Bob than home-built Softail Bobber.

But... sitting in the shop, looking at my scoots, reminiscing about the "Old Days"... Yes I do!
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Old 11-13-2017, 02:29 PM   #4
Irish   Irish is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philr View Post
I have memories of the "Good-ole-days"... Amal carbs with the slide stuck open, buying drive chain at local machine-shop, Lucas electrics, running tires until they were no longer tires. If you needed parts, only chance for "in-stock" was a motorcycle junkyard, for electronics you better know an automotive interchange or easy to modify.

Still have an old pair of engineer boots with a 530 "Master Link" attached. Removing links to continue using a worn-out chain, Flopping sprockets when they were worn, running them until they were no longer sprockets. Of course, this was a time when "gas station attendant" was a viable career choice... and no one cared if you "wanted fries with that."

Admittedly, I still modify parts for custom applications, mostly to stay in practice and because I like the challenge. Since attaining the age of Social-Security, convenience/dependability is most important... late model Tacoma pick-up and more often ride FXBB Softail Street Bob than home-built Softail Bobber.

But... sitting in the shop, looking at my scoots, reminiscing about the "Old Days"... Yes I do!
I used to love the later model Amal carbs. The 1st thing that you do is *hitcan the chokes & thread the openings in the top piece. Then you take the plastic float bowls & sand off the "mold" marks. Then take a piece of Scotchbrite & polish the throttle slide & slide bores & you will never have trouble with them again. I used to run them at the Drag Strip & they were flawless! Take the plastic float needles & replace them with the metal ones with the rubber tips & fuel leakage is taken care of. Irish
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Old 11-12-2017, 08:24 PM   #5
wheelbender6   wheelbender6 is offline
 
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I miss the simplicity of machines from the old days. I don't miss adjusting points and greasing the chassis.
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Old 11-13-2017, 12:29 PM   #6
sc00ter   sc00ter is offline
 
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I had a MINT 4 door 76 Chevy Malibu. Fridge green with a white interior and white vinyl top. Had the 350 motor with a auto trans, factory air, power steering, power brakes, cruise control and only 71,000 miles. I loved that car so much. Loaned it to a friend who made a illegal u-turn and got smacked by a Suburban. Totaled the car. Bought it back and pulled the motor and trans to help a friend rescue his old truck that needed a motor. When I looked to replace the Malibu I looked high and low for the perfect car to replace it. What did I end up with? A new 93 Toyota Camry wagon. I have no idea why I went with a new car. The Malibu never gave me a issue, it rode super smooth, attracted attention because it sounded great (Flow Masters) and was easy to service. My sister said I just grew up and I think she's right. I also loved that Camry. Now the wife and I are Subaru people. As tempted as we are to get a Brat we passed at 3 that we ran across. We like our Baja more. Again, no idea why we stick with newer /modern cars now.
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Old 11-19-2017, 08:33 AM   #7
Roscoe   Roscoe is offline
 
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Jeeze the cars I've had through the years would bring a million bucks at a classic car auction now. 55 Chevys, several Super sports and couple of C1,C3 old vetts ... but I got old, now I'm happy with my Toyota Camry, I put a remote start on it 15 years ago and keep the old Camry maintained. I've even got a brand new gallon of genuine high dollar Toyota antifreeze to put in it this year, if I get around to it. Fuel injection solved so many problems, kids today have no idea what they are missing.
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